Posts Tagged ‘podcast’

A time to fast | Science

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/362/6416/770.full

Addressing the minimum fleet problem in on-demand urban mobility | Nature

Saturday, August 18th, 2018

Addressing the minimum fleet problem in on-demand urban mobility by @mmvazifeh, @stevenstrogatz et al.
https://www.Nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0095-1 Solved by putting taxis & their riders into a large #network

Muons: the little-known particles helping to probe the impenetrable

Saturday, August 18th, 2018

Muons: the little-known particles helping to probe the impenetrable, via @NaturePodcast https://www.Nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05254-2 Using “muography” to see into the ground, beneath volcanos & into pyramids

Cryo-EM structure of substrate-bound human telomerase holoenzyme | Nature

Sunday, April 29th, 2018

#CryoEM structure of substrate-bound human telomerase holoenzyme https://www.Nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0062-x Quote: “2 flexibly RNA-tethered lobes: the catalytic core (w/ #TERT & conserved motifs of telomerase RNA) & an H/ACA RNP”

The Moth | Stories | Data Mining for Dates

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

https://themoth.org/stories/data-mining-for-dates

Nels Elde podcast

Monday, November 21st, 2016

TWiEVO 9: How to crash your gene drive
July 5, 2016
Hosts: Nels Elde and Vincent Racaniello
Guest: Jim Bull
Nels and Vincent speak with Jim Bull about the results of genetic models which suggest that the evolution of inbreeding in response to lethal gene drive might make population control difficult to achieve.

21khz: The Art of Money In Music

Thursday, December 31st, 2015

Some quick thoughts after listening to first 9 episodes

“Will Musicians Survive in the Age of Free When the “Bottle” is worth more than the wine” – a great line & an observation that the spotify platform is worth more than its music . See also:
http://unsoundthemovie.com/

“Intent, Licenses and “Sweat of the Brow” – helpful discussion of copyright but it would have been nice to hear about copyleft & re-combining of artworks

“two letters and a number” – MP3.com was originally someone’s name. Robertson’s story how on how to be sued & wooed simultaneously

“so… Why does Liza Minnelli get paid when the Sex Pistols Stream?” – how to weight things (downloads or listeners) & various frauds based on this…

Can you Sell Something that Doesn’t Exist? – Superfans: would you rather collect unemployment or by the latest Doors album?

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/21khz-the-art-of-money-in-music/id987160981

Metallurgy: Iron production electrified : Nature : Nature Publishing Group

Sunday, October 20th, 2013

Iron production electrified. New tech for extraction of Fe directly from its oxide w/o C via high-T #electrolysis.
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v497/n7449/full/nature12102.html

This piece contains an interesting discussion of new blast furnace technology, which enables one to extract the oxygen directly from iron oxide without the need for carbon or the creation of carbon dioxide as it uses electrolysis. The key idea is being able to do this at very high temperatures.

QT:”
Kerri Smith: Extracting iron from its naturally found form, iron oxide is a hot and heavy business. You throw your iron oxide and some carbon into a blastfurnace and then heat it to 1600 degrees Celsius, out comes iron, worldwide about a billion tons of it a year, but also outcomes carbon dioxide- bad news for the environment. Scientists would like to use other friendlier methods to make iron. This week a team from MIT reports a way to convert iron oxide to iron using electricity. It’s not a new idea. It’s basically a form of
electrolysis which extracts the oxygen leaving pure iron behind. But they’ve gotten over the biggest problem, finding material that can withstand the temperatures of molten metal oxides. Metallurgist Derek Fray at the University of Cambridge in the UK has written a News and Views article about the research. He started by telling me how much CO2, iron production is responsible for. Nature (2013); Nature(2013) ”

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v497/n7449/full/nature12102.html