Posts Tagged ‘from’

Attached: Cancer Therapy Advisor Q&A

Sunday, March 17th, 2019

February 13, 2019
Q&A With Mark B. Gerstein, PhD, on Diagnostic Genomic vs Exomic Sequencing Bryant Furlow
https://www.cancertherapyadvisor.com/home/cancer-topics/general-oncology/qa-with-mark-b-gerstein-phd-on-diagnostic-genomic-vs-exomic-sequencing/

Final Article — American Scholar Magazine

Tuesday, March 12th, 2019

WORKS IN PROGRESS – SPRING 2019
Decoding DNA
On the hunt for the genetic roots of mental illnesses

By Marcus Banks | March 4, 2019

QT:[[”
The model, a form of artificial intelligence, aims to use abstract knowledge gained in the research lab to improve clinical treatments for real patients. The ultimate goal, says Gerstein, is to use the model to develop pharmaceutical treatments that reduce the impact of schizophrenia. Part of the challenge in developing drugs to treat the disease is the fact that it is not a one-size-fits-all condition. “]]

https://theamericanscholar.org/decoding-dna/#.XH7RRlNKiqA

Explore the NIST Privacy Engineering Collaboration Space

Monday, March 11th, 2019

QT:[[”
the launch of the NIST Privacy Engineering Collaboration Space! The collaboration space is an online venue open to the public where practitioners can discover, share, discuss, and improve upon open source tools, solutions, and processes that support privacy
engineering and risk management. We have launched the space with a focus on de-identification and privacy risk management tools and use cases, gathered via GitHub for collaboration purposes.
“]]

https://www.nist.gov/itl/applied-cybersecurity/privacy-engineering/collaboration-space

UMAPs

Sunday, March 3rd, 2019

A lineage-resolved molecular atlas of C elegans embryogenesis at #singlecell resolution, w/ @JIsaacMurray, @JunhyongKim, @ColeTrapnell & B Waterston https://www.BiorXiv.org/content/10.1101/565549v1 Compares the known cell lineage of the worm to trees based on UMAP cell-type clusters. Remarkable agreement

https://twitter.com/MarkGerstein/status/1101927645145645056

A single-cell molecular map of mouse gastrulation and early organogenesis | Nature

Friday, March 1st, 2019

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-0933-9

The single-cell transcriptional landscape of mammalian organogenesis

Friday, March 1st, 2019

Using single-cell combinatorial indexing, we profiled the
transcriptomes of around 2 million cells derived from 61 embryos staged between 9.5 and 13.5 days of gestation, in a single experiment.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-0969-x.epdf

Small research teams ‘disrupt’ science more radically than large ones

Friday, March 1st, 2019

QT:[[”
“The authors describe and validate a citation-based index of ‘disruptiveness’ that has previously been proposed for patents6. The intuition behind the index is straightforward: when the papers that cite a given article also reference a substantial proportion of that article’s references, then the article can be seen as consolidating its scientific domain. When the converse is true — that is, when future citations to the article do not also acknowledge the article’s own intellectual forebears — the article can be seen as disrupting its domain.

The disruptiveness index reflects a characteristic of the article’s underlying content that is clearly distinguishable from impact as conventionally captured by overall citation counts. For instance, the index finds that papers that directly contribute to Nobel prizes tend to exhibit high levels of disruptiveness, whereas, at the other extreme, review articles tend to consolidate their fields.”
“]]

http://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-00350-3

This Person Does Not Exist

Thursday, February 28th, 2019

https://thispersondoesnotexist.com/

Quantifying the Holocaust: Hyperintense kill rates during the Nazi genocide | Science Advances

Wednesday, February 20th, 2019

Rather scary

http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/5/1/eaau7292.full

The MOOC pivot | Science

Wednesday, February 20th, 2019

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/363/6423/130.full
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/363/6423/130