Posts Tagged ‘quote’

Efforts to make buildings greener are not working

Sunday, February 10th, 2019

QT:((”
“One reason is the rebound effect. Insulate buildings better, and people will wear fewer layers rather than turn the heat down. The way energy-efficiency schemes are structured does not help, argues Richard Twinn of the UK Green Building Council, a think-tank. The schemes only finance a single type of upgrade at a time, such as loft insulation. A whole-house retrofit, in contrast, could have added digital
thermostats to ensure that greater efficiency was converted into lower bills rather than higher temperatures.”
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Efforts to make buildings greener are not working
https://www.economist.com/international/2019/01/05/efforts-to-make-buildings-greener-are-not-working

The Presidency: The Hardest Job in the World – The Atlantic

Sunday, February 10th, 2019

Good quotes:
QT:((
Hoover noted, “When we are sick, we want an uncommon doctor; when we have a construction job to do, we want an uncommon engineer; and when we are at war, we want an uncommon general. It is only when we get into politics that we are satisfied with the common man.”

There’s just too much to do. Instead, presidents should follow Calvin Coolidge’s model. “Perhaps one of the most important accomplishments of my administration has been minding my own business,” he said. …
Can one person handle all this? In 1955, former President Herbert Hoover completed a review—his second—of executive-branch efficiency and suggested the addition of an administrative vice president to help the overloaded president. (The existing vice president was apparently already too busy.) Hoover’s report was issued a few months before President Eisenhower had his first heart attack. It was the fifth heart attack or stroke to hit a current or former president since the Wilson administration ended, in 1921. This caused the columnist Walter Lippmann to wonder whether the job was too much for one man to bear. Addressing the “intolerable strain” on the president, Lippmann wrote, “The load has become so enormously greater … because of the wars of this century, because of the huge growth of the American population, of the American economy, and of American responsibilities.”
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https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/05/a-broken-office/556883/

AlphaFold @ CASP13: “What just happened?”

Friday, February 8th, 2019

QT:((”
“Let me get the most important question out of the way: is AlphaFold’s advance really significant, or is it more of the same? I would characterize their advance as roughly two CASPs in one (really ~1.8x). Historically progress in CASP has ebbed and flowed, with a ten year period of almost absolute stagnation, finally broken by the advances seen at CASP11 and 12, which were substantial. What we’ve seen this year is roughly twice as much as the recent average rate of advance (measured in mean ΔGDT_TS from CASP10 to CASP12—GDT_TS is a measure of prediction accuracy ranging from 0 to 100, with 100 being perfect.) As I will explain later, there may actually be a good reason for this “two CASPs” effect, in terms of the underlying methodological breakdown. This can be seen not only in the CASP-over-CASP
improvement, but also in terms of the size of the gap between AlphaFold and the second best performer, which is unusually large by CASP standards. Below is a plot that depicts this.”
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https://moalquraishi.wordpress.com/2018/12/09/alphafold-casp13-what-just-happened/

Instrumental variables estimation – Wikipedia

Sunday, February 3rd, 2019

QT:((”
Intuitively, IVs are used when an explanatory variable of interest is correlated with the error term, in which case ordinary least squares and ANOVA give biased results.
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instrumental_variables_estimation

Panoramio is no longer available

Monday, January 28th, 2019

http://www.panoramio.com/

QT:

10 Best Summer Road Trips in New England

Friday, January 25th, 2019

QT:{{”
“HOUSATONIC VALLEY, Connecticut

On this New England road trip, following Route 7 along the Housatonic River from New Milford to Canaan reveals the green beauty of Western Connecticut. There’s a covered bridge and waterfalls.
Distance: 35 miles.

THE QUIET CORNER, Connecticut

Travel back in history for bucolic tranquility on quiet CT169 from Old Norwich to Woodstock, meandering past colonial homesteads and stone walls, farmers’ fields and quaint town greens.
Distance: 40 miles.”
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https://newengland.com/today/travel/new-england/things-to-do/10-best-summer-road-trips-in-new-england/

Why the Father of Modern Statistics Didn’t Believe Smoking Caused Cancer

Friday, January 25th, 2019

Why the Father of Modern #Statistics Didn’t Believe Smoking Caused
Cancer https://priceonomics.com/why-the-father-of-modern-statistics-didnt-believe/ Interesting article on how even geniuses can be wrong. With a great line: “If he were alive today, Ronald Fisher would have one hell of a Twitter account.”

Austin Bradford Hill – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2019

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austin_Bradford_Hill

QT:{{”
Sir Austin Bradford Hill FRS[1] (8 July 1897 – 18 April 1991), English epidemiologistand statistician, pioneered the randomized clinical trial and, together with Richard Doll, demonstrated the connection between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. Hill is widely known for pioneering the “Bradford Hill” criteria for determining a causal association.[2][3]
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British Doctors Study – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2019

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Doctors_Study

QT:{{”
The British Doctors’ Study was a prospective cohort study which ran from 1951 to 2001, and in … Context[edit]. Although there had been suspicions of a link between smokingand various diseases, the evidence for this link had been largely circumstantial. … The original study was run by Richard Doll and Austin Bradford Hill.
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Quantification of collider-stratification bias and the birthweight paradox. – PubMed – NCBI

Sunday, January 13th, 2019

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19689488

QT:{{”
Recently, causal diagrams have been used to illustrate the possibility for collider-stratification bias in models adjusting for birthweight. When two variables share a common effect, stratification on the variable representing that effect induces a statistical relation between otherwise independent factors.
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