Posts Tagged ‘hasshadow’

Human brain samples yield a genomic trove | Science

Saturday, December 15th, 2018

The papers are out!
Using the tag pecrollout for this.
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/362/6420/1227

QT: {{”
The project’s namesake, ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements), was a broader quest to map noncoding regions of the human genome. Its initial results, unveiled in 2012, stirred controversy. Scientists disputed the team’s claim that most of the genome was functional and questioned whether the project’s insights would be worth NIH’s $185 million investment (Science, 21 March 2014, p. 1306).
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Human brain samples yield a genomic trove | Science

Saturday, December 15th, 2018

The papers are out!
Using the tag pecrollout for this.
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/362/6420/1227

QT: {{”
The project’s namesake, ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements), was a broader quest to map noncoding regions of the human genome. Its initial results, unveiled in 2012, stirred controversy. Scientists disputed the team’s claim that most of the genome was functional and questioned whether the project’s insights would be worth NIH’s $185 million investment (Science, 21 March 2014, p. 1306).
“}}

Link a G Suite Account to Google Home – Android – Google Home Help

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

https://support.google.com/googlehome/answer/7571892?co=GENIE.Platform%3DAndroid&hl=en

Looks like it’s hard to like a G suite acct to the voice asst

csquare questions relating to Turkey

Monday, November 12th, 2018

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4904778/
Turkish Population Structure and Genetic Ancestry Reveal Relatedness among Eurasian Populations
Uğur Hodoğlugil1 and Robert W. Mahley1,2,*

“For example, supervised STRUCTURE (K = 3) illustrates a genetic ancestry for the Turks of 45% Middle Eastern (95% CI, 42–49), 40% European (95% CI, 36–44), and 15% Central Asian (95% CI, 13–16), whereas at K = 4 the genetic ancestry of the Turks was 38% European (95% CI, 35–42), 35% Middle Eastern (95% CI, 33–38), 18% South Asian (95% CI, 16–19), and 9% Central Asian (95% CI, 7–11). …. Thus, this study demonstrates admixture of Turkish people reflecting the population migration patterns.”

Also:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Population_exchange_between_Greece_and_Turkey

iPad Notebook export for Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts

Saturday, November 3rd, 2018

Some quick quotes from
{{
Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts Dehaene, Stanislas
Citation (MLA): Dehaene, Stanislas. Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts. Penguin Publishing Group, 2014. Kindle file.
}}
that I really liked

Each short quote below is in order as it appears in book

QT:{{”
These two anecdotes are reported by Jacques Hadamard, a world-class mathematician who dedicated a fascinating book to the mathematician’s mind.75 Hadamard deconstructed the process of mathematical discovery into four successive stages: initiation, incubation, illumination, and verification.

It is crucial to understand that, in this sort of coding scheme, the silent neurons, which do not fire, also encode information. Their muteness implicitly signals to others that their preferred feature is not present or is irrelevant to the current mental scene. A conscious content is defined just as much by its silent neurons as by its active ones.

As we discussed in Chapter 5, the prefrontal cortex, a pivotal hub of the conscious workspace, occupies a sizable portion of any primate’s brain—but in the human species, it is vastly expanded.45 Among all primates, human prefrontal neurons are the ones with the largest dendritic trees.46

One of these regions, called the frontopolar cortex, or Brodmann’s area 10, is larger in Homo sapiens than in any other ape.

Another special region is Broca’s area, the left inferior frontal region that plays a critical role in human language.

At a more microscopic level, the huge pyramidal cells in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (layers 2 and 3), with their extensive dendrites capable of receiving thousands of synaptic connections, are much smaller in schizophrenic patients. They exhibit fewer spines, the terminal sites of excitatory synapses whose enormous density is characteristic of the human brain. This loss of connectivity may well play a major causal role in schizophrenia. Indeed, many of the genes that are disrupted in schizophrenia affect either or both of two major molecular neurotransmission systems, the dopamine D2 and glutamate NMDA receptors,

Most interesting, perhaps, is that normal adults experience a transient schizophrenia-like psychosis when taking drugs such as phencyclidine (better known as PCP, or angel dust) and ketamine. These agents act by blocking neuronal transmission, quite specifically, at excitatory synapses of the NMDA
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Papers for Journal Club

Thursday, June 7th, 2018

Alternative evolutionary histories in the sequence space of an ancient protein https://www.Nature.com/articles/nature23902 Great viz of different potential but not necessarily realized evolutionary trajectories. Quite relevant for molecular #evolution & #pseudogenes

Paper for Journal Club Tomorrow

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2018

Susceptibility of brain atrophy to TRIB3 in #Alzheimer’s disease, evidence from functional prioritization in imaging genetics
http://www.PNAS.org/content/115/12/3162.long Nice connection of developing phenotypes from #imaging, combined w. simple polygenic scores from genotypes

Data-Driven Wellness & Personal Coaching – Arivale

Sunday, May 20th, 2018

https://www.arivale.com/

Seo Young-Deok – Opera Gallery

Sunday, May 6th, 2018

http://www.operagallery.com/seo-young-deok
bike chains!

iPad Notebook export for Significant Figures: The Lives and Work of Great Mathematicians

Sunday, April 29th, 2018

Some quick quotes from
{{
Significant Figures: The Lives and Work of Great Mathematicians Stewart, Ian
Citation (MLA): Stewart, Ian. Significant Figures: The Lives and Work of Great Mathematicians. Basic Books, 2017. Kindle file.
}}
that I really liked

Each short quote below is preceded by the words “Highlight” & indication of the location in the book.

9 The Heat Operator • Joseph Fourier
Highlight(orange) – Page 91 · Location 1439
The precise form of the equation led Fourier to a simple solution, in a special case. If the initial temperature distribution is a sine curve, with a maximum temperature in the middle which tails away towards the ends, then as time passes the temperature has the same profile, but this decays exponentially towards zero.
10 Invisible Scaffolding • Carl Friedrich Gauss
Highlight(orange) – Page 98 · Location 1536
When Gauss was eight, his schoolteacher Büttner set the class an arithmetic problem. It’s often stated that this was to add the numbers from 1 to 100, but that’s probably a simplification.
14 The Laws of Thought • George Boole
Highlight(orange) – Page 146 · Location 2255
The quadratic is then the square (px + qy) 2 of a linear form. A coordinate change is a geometric distortion, and it carries the original lines to the corresponding ones for the new variables. If the two lines coincide for the original variables, they therefore coincide for the new ones. So the discriminants must be related in such a manner that if one vanishes, so does the other. Invariance is the formal expression of this relationship.
21 The Formula Man • Srinivasa Ramanujan
Highlight(orange) – Page 223 · Location 3480
For the first three years of his life, he scarcely said a word, and his mother feared he was dumb. Aged five, he didn’t like his teacher and didn’t want to go to school. He preferred to think about things for himself, asking annoying questions such as ‘How far apart are clouds?’ Ramanujan’s mathematical talents surfaced early, and by the age of 11 he had outstripped two college students who lodged at his home.
23 The Machine Stops • Alan Turing
Highlight(orange) – Page 251 · Location 3929
After the war Turing moved to London, and worked on the design of one of the first computers, ACE (Automatic Computing Engine) at the National Physical Laboratory. Early in 1946 he gave a presentation on the design of a stored-program computer –far more detailed than the American mathematician John von Neumann’s slightly earlier design for EDVAC (Electronic Discrete Variable Automatic Computer). The ACE project was slowed down by official secrecy about Bletchley Park, so Turing went back to Cambridge for a year,
Highlight(orange) – Page 252 · Location 3940
He worked on phyllotaxis, the remarkable tendency of plant structures to involve Fibonacci numbers 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, and so on, each being the sum of the previous two.
24 Father of Fractals • Benoit Mandelbrot
Highlight(orange) – Page 261 · Location 4084
In general, if the rank-n item has frequency proportional to nc, for some constant c, we speak of a cth power law.
Highlight(orange) – Page 261 · Location 4085
Classical statistics pays little attention to power-law distributions, focusing instead on the normal distribution (or bell curve), for a variety of reasons, some good. But nature often seems to use power-law distributions instead.
Highlight(orange) – Page 265 · Location 4147
Julia, and another mathematician Pierre Fatou, had analysed the strange behaviour of complex functions under iteration. That is, start with some number, apply the function to that to get a second number, then apply the function to that to get a third number, and so on, indefinitely. They focused on the simplest nontrivial case: quadratic functions of the form f( z) = z2 + c for a complex constant c.